About Motorizing Your Fishing Kayak

Electric or gas outboard?

Electric trolling motors can be very useful on kayaking ventures, but once the battery goes flat, a rather unfortunate situation, you may find yourself stranded a long distance from your initial launching spot. When this happens, you will be forced to paddle your fishing kayak with a heavy battery on board, all the way back the way you came, possibly against wind and/or current. In addition, the propeller of the electric trolling motor might become entangled in submerged fishing lines, seaweed, and other underwater obstacles, especially in shallow water, a common locale to go fishing with your kayak.

It’s plain common sense that people don’t get stronger with age, and many senior anglers find they can’t go fishing from kayaks because they don’t have the strength necessary to paddle long distances and in inclement conditions, such as against the wind, or current.

2-cycle or 4-cycle outboard motor?

Taking all of these problems into consideration, such senior kayak anglers may be interested by a new method of motorizing fishing kayaks .In addition, the motor used is a sleek, modern, 4-cycle (4 stroke) engine that is a cinch to start, easy to maintain, lacks the need for mixing oil and fuel, does not create odorous fumes, and is quieter. All of this superior performance is achieved without it being heavier than a 2 stroke engine of the same size.

You may want to use a two cycle engine, but these motors are known to be stinky, and often irritatingly loud. In fact, new outboard motors on the market are all 4-cycle.

Perhaps this movie could inspire you? –

More info on this small motorboat concept viewed from the standpoint of a small boat owner >

Posted in choosing a fishing kayak, Electric Trolling Motors For Fishing Kayaks, ergonomics, fatigue, fishing kayak, Fishing Kayak Ergonomics, fishing kayak paddling, Fishing Kayaks, kayak angler, Kayak Fishing, Kayak fishing, kayak fishing movie, kayak fishing safety, kayak movie, kayak safety, long trips, microskiff, motorized fishing kayak, motorized fishing kayaks, motorized kayaks, motorizing kayaks, paddling, physical limitations, rigging fishing kayaks, rigging your fishing kayak, safety, shallow water, Wavewalk kayak | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishing Kayaks’ Hidden Costs

Many products include hidden costs, even fishing kayaks…

Adding the cost of accessories to an already expensive fishing kayak can greatly increases the price of a product that’s meant to be inexpensive.

The cost of accessories, including kayak seats, rudders, racks, and outriggers, adds up to a sizable amount of money when heaped on even supposedly inexpensive kayaks:

• Kayak Seat: Spending $100–$200 on a kayak seat that won’t reduce kayak fishing back pain is clearly a waste of money. Kayak seats can be so bad that many kayak anglers quit the sport due to extreme discomfort and chronic pain.

• Rudder: Why would you have to spend $200-$300 to be able to steer a fishing kayak when you should be able to control it without one? Rudders are annoying to use, slow, and are bogged down by weeds.

• Outriggers: Stability for $100 – $400, even when it should be part of the kayak’s original design? Why would you spend money on that? Outriggers are an annoyance to install, they slow you down, limit your fishing kayak’s mobility, and limit your fishing kayaks ability to maneuver. Also, outriggers are heavy and cumbersome.

• Installing a special kayak rack that can cost Hundreds of Dollars, just to be able to transport your fishing kayak is ridiculous, and when mounted it takes up space that could be used for other utilities.

Rudders, racks, and outriggers are a nuisance to deal with, and kayak seats are lumbar killers. When you’re looking for fishing kayaks, don’t forget hidden costs of accessories.

So, why not buy a product that won’t have any of these hidden costs? A lack of a need for any of these extra products would lower the cost of a fishing kayak tremendously. The only fishing kayak that has no hidden costs is the W-500 fishing kayak, whose revolutionary new design gets rid of any needs for extra accessories.

Posted in back challenges, back injury, back pain, backrest, choosing a fishing kayak, ergonomics, fatigue, fish, fishing kayak, fishing kayak design, Fishing Kayak Ergonomics, fishing kayak review, Fishing Kayaks, kayak design, Kayak fishing, long trips, lower back, lumbar spine, lumbar support, mobility problems, paddling, posture, rigging fishing kayaks, rigging your fishing kayak, spine, stretching, Wavewalk kayak, yak back | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why and How To Motorize Your Fishing Kayak

Here are some observations related to motorizing your fishing kayak:

1.) Many kayak anglers do not appreciate paddling a great distance to get to a good spot. Spending time kayak fishing is preferable to pedaling or paddling. Large, expensive motorboats that require trailers, ramps and maintenance are increasingly viewed as problematic.

2.) Electric Trolling Motors also do not make the cut. Whether you carry a heavy battery, or an expensive lithium-ion battery, your fishing trips are going to be limited in length by the battery life. Some kayak anglers I know avoid using their trolling motors altogether for these reasons.

3.) Kayak anglers would love to go on long fishing trips, which are made possible by gas outboard engines, since gasoline is king as far as easy storage in concerned, as well as in the power category.

In a perfect world, there would be a car-toppable, small, ergonomic and stable motorboat that would enable the ability for long hours of fishing as well as the capability to fish standing up. Surprisingly, such a product exists- as illustrated below:

Spectacular, isn’t it?
Outboard motors won’t fit a fishing kayak, but they do on this W500 model. Owning this unique fishing kayak may not necessarily entail gas motorizing it, as paddling and electric trolling are still viable options. Kayak Motorization is explained in detail in multiple blog posts, and is a common topic among kayak anglers.                     

Posted in choosing a fishing kayak, Electric Trolling Motors For Fishing Kayaks, exercise, fatigue, fish, fishing kayak, fishing kayak design, Fishing Kayak Ergonomics, fishing kayak paddling, fishing kayak review, Fishing Kayak Storage, Fishing Kayaks, kayak angler, kayak design, Kayak Fishing, Kayak fishing, kayak fishing movie, kayak fishing safety, kayak movie, kayak safety, kayaking, long trips, microskiff, mobility problems, motorized fishing kayak, motorized fishing kayaks, motorized kayaks, motorizing kayaks, paddling, pedaling, physical limitations, rigging fishing kayaks, rigging your fishing kayak, safety, shallow water, sit on top, storage, Wavewalk kayak | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Realization of the Stand-Up Kayak Fishing Dream

Fishing standing in a kayak has often been dismissed as an impossibility, and didn’t receive much serious attention in the fishing kayak community. Fishing kayak manufacturers, knowing they couldn’t effectively offer this as an option, tried to play down the idea as ‘unnecessary’ and claimed it conflicted with the idea of ‘classic kayak fishing’.

However, in view of an expanding demand for stable fishing kayaks, fishing kayak manufacturers realized that they somehow needed to think up some kind of response. They began selling increasingly wide sit-on-top (SOT) fishing kayaks that became increasingly cumbersome and difficult to paddle, a very impractical approach. Nevertheless, these ludicrous designs were promoted as being stable enough to allow stand up kayak fishing.

Some anglers fall for this hype, but sooner or later they come to the realization that although the new, ridiculously wide fishing kayaks were indeed more stable than the narrower models, to an extent, they still weren’t nearly stable enough to allow for fishing while standing up. This had to do with the dual lack of initial stability and secondary stability, as well as the deficiency of such kayaks in offering a ‘Plan B’ solution for dealing with situations in which the angler has already been destabilized, as often occurs, and they are facing the undesirable and potentially dangerous possibility of falling overboard with their fishing gear and tackle in tow.

To try and remedy the problem, some manufacturers began offering solutions that involved the utilization of kayak outriggers. Those may have moderately improved initial stability, but they still failed to solve the problem of “what if?” – that is what should the angler do if they suddenly lose balance in their kayak, and are forced to fall overboard – an event sarcastically referred to as ‘going swimming’.

Insofar, Wavewalk Fishing Kayaks are the only fishing kayaks that provide satisfactory initial and secondary stability, as well as a solution in case the standing kayak angler loses their stability. This effective stand-up stability is achieved through a combination of optimal ergonomic design that maximizes kayak stability as well as the incorporation of a saddle that the angler can fall on if necessary, and regain balance instantly.

With the advent of this solution, anglers finally have a fishing kayak from which they can fish standing up comfortably, easily, and with the peace of mind that they are safe in case anything goes wrong. The Wavewalk Kayak has made stand-up fishing not only much more practically and easy to do, but also an enjoyable activity that can be done by even an amateur angler.

Posted in choosing a fishing kayak, ergonomics, fatigue, fish, fishing kayak, fishing kayak design, Fishing Kayak Ergonomics, Fishing Kayaks, kayak angler, kayak dealers, kayak design, Kayak Fishing, Kayak fishing, kayak fishing magazine, Kayak Fishing Media, kayak fishing movie, kayak fishing safety, kayak fishing standing, kayak fishing technique, kayak fly fishing, kayak safety, kayak sale, kayak stores, paddling, physical limitations, posture, rigging fishing kayaks, safety, shallow water, sit on top, sit-on-top kayak, SOT, SOT kayak, stand up, stand up kayak fishing, standing, stretching, Wavewalk kayak | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to avoid scratches in your kayak’s hull, and how to repair such scratches once they occur

Hull scratching can occur when your fishing kayak travels over sharp surfaces, such as concrete ramps, oyster bars, and sharp rocks. Scratches are usually not a problem, and do not need much attention.

Nevertheless, if you want to avoid scratches on your fishing kayak, watch out for hazards in the water, especially when fishing or paddling in shallow water.

Kayak fishing and paddling from a higher spot than normal kayaks offers you an advantage in noticing possible hazards before scraping against them. Kayaks such as the W fishing kayak offer this advantage, as W anglers will affirm. This higher spot is also helpful in detecting fish.

When repairing scratches in plastic kayaks, the method is similar, even with different depths and lengths of the scratch. For cosmetic scratches, no repairs are recommended, but if you want to do something, you can just heat the scratch using a propane blow torch.

Apply the flame over the scratch slowly and tentatively until it disappears or diminishes considerably, while not overheating the space, to not cause a deformity.

Direct the fire in an acute angle, and not directly in the front. This will decrease the chances of accidental overheating.

(Caution: Heating plastic will change its color)

Spoon and Hand torch, used for repair

For deep cuts, warm the end of a metal spoon, and administer the tip moderately along the cut, welding it shut.

As well as in shallow cuts, be careful not to overheat, and deform the plastic

Cuts in a polyethylene kayaks, which do not occur often, must be fixed correctly: Welding will not fix a broken hull, but welding a patch to the interior of the kayak on the cracked area, will resolve the problem. This is because if welded, the hull in the broken area will be much weaker than other areas, and may reopen while kayak fishing or paddling.

Cracks above the waterline can be patched with rivets, which is not recommended for lower breaches.

Protecting the hand that is wielding your device is very important, as metal conducts heat.

Beware and remove any possible flammable materials, and do not direct the fire at others, as well as keeping children and pets far away.
(If you lack in experience in using blow torches and hot objects, it is not advised that you undertake in these projects)

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Hybrid fishing kayaks – reality, myth, and hype

Older fishermen are on the look for new products to improve their kayak fishing user experience, especially in terms of stability and ergonomics. Some kayak companies are attempting to match this demand by offering wide fishing kayaks known as Hybrid Kayaks. This kayak design is a mix of kayak, and canoe, or essentially a small, flat canoe with little or no free board.

Kayak fishing media are filled to the brim with reviews praising the stability and new canvas frame seats that some of these hybrid fishing kayaks feature. Some manufacturers claim that these hybrid kayaks offer the ability to fish standing up, which is arguably false, when it comes to the average Joe fishing in the real world.

What’s The Truth Behind This Hype?

Are these hybrid fishing kayaks as stable as claimed, and are they less uncomfortable or better in any other way than the conventional SOT kayak and sit in kayaks? Read more in this comprehensive report on hybrid fishing kayaks .

Posted in back challenges, back pain, backrest, choosing a fishing kayak, circulation, ergonomics, fatigue, fish, fishing kayak, fishing kayak design, Fishing Kayak Ergonomics, fishing kayak paddling, fishing kayak review, Fishing Kayaks, kayak angler, kayak design, Kayak Fishing, Kayak fishing, kayak fishing magazine, Kayak Fishing Media, kayak fishing safety, kayak fishing standing, kayak safety, kayaking, leg numbness, leg pain, long trips, lower back, lumbar spine, lumbar support, mobility problems, muscle ache, paddling, physical limitations, posture, safety, sciatica, sit on top, sit-on-top kayak, SOT, SOT kayak, spine, stand up, stand up kayak fishing, standing, stretching, Wavewalk kayak, yak back | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment